Asus Is Planning A $200 – $250 Netbook With Google’s Help – Chrome OS or Android 3.0 ?

chrome news  Asus Is Planning A $200   $250 Netbook With Googles Help   Chrome OS or Android 3.0 ?

Asus Chrome OS

Asus, the company which made netbooks popular is getting ready for something bigger now. After taking a hit from the growing smartphone and tablet PCs, its time for them to re-think their netbook business model.

Digitimes, is reporting that they are planning to bring the prices down to $200, and take advantage of either Android 3.0 or Chrome OS.

Affected by tablet PCs, a 10-inch single-core Atom netbook with a price below US$280 has already appeared in the retail channel, while dual-core models’ ASPs are only at around NT$12,000 (US$405), and as more tablet PCs are set to launch in the near future, market watchers are conservative about netbook’s future.

However, as Asustek will launch a model with a price of US$200-250, it should help the company avoid direct competition from tablet PCs, which are priced at around US$299-499.

The sources believe that Asustek’s new netbook should either adopt Google’s Android 3.0 or Chrome OS in order to achieve such a price level, and the new model is expected to attract consumers who only need to perform office work and Internet browsing.

 

Now, Chrome OS or Android for a netbook, may be a confusing question for Asus, Android is already popular and used on all kinds of devices. Chrome OS is still a baby, and things are not so stable out there.

However, Google has clear plans for Chrome OS and Android. They have made it clear that Chrome OS will initially ship on Netbooks or Notebooks. Or, as their ex CEO said, Android is for devices with a touchscreen, and Chrome OS for devices with keyboard.

Google is getting ready for world domination with Chrome OS, they have Acer and Samsung with us ( if things succeed, everyone else will join, we know what happened with Android ) so, having Asus, a leader in Netbooks on their side will do only good things for them. I think they will convince Asus about the netbook way.

What do you think ?

via Engadget

11 Comments

Add yours →

  1. Depending on the specs, and assuming it will run Chrome OS, I’m very intrigued and would consider purchasing one, myself (mainly depending on how much speed my Cr-48 gains, over time).

    Regarding the decision on whether to run Chrome OS v. Android, I think the recent hackfest on Android lends strong support to Chrome OS’s security features (and exclusions).

    • and think about what a Verizon contract can do to it !! the first $0 Laptop ever ?

      Will other companies follow this model ?

      • I’m under the impression that at least a few cell phone carriers have already given out “$0″ laptops (in reality, I’m confident consumers are actually paying for them in the form of contract price/terms), unless we’re excluding netbooks.

        Will other companies follow the $0 laptop model or the $200 model?

        I think if Chrome OS catches fire, OEMs will basically be forced (by consumer demand) to follow the terminal (Chrome OS) model. I imagine we’re at least a few years out on this, on the other hand.

        As for the cell phone carriers, as I said above, I think we’ve seen that, already (we’ll probably see it more).

    • @Cougar Abogado,
      you really have a point here about security. ChromeOS really have great security features.

  2. I was interested in getting a Netbook for travels, but forgo the idea completely when we bought an iPad last year :)

  3. $200 is a nice quote. I think every company can sell with this price!

  4. I’m curious as to where the Motorola Atrix fits with this description: “Android is for devices with a touchscreen, and Chrome OS for devices with keyboard.”
    It seems like smartphone OS’ are becoming too smart for just labeling them as a -phone. The iPad/iOS is also an interesting example of this. So, what is really going to be the market for Chrome when, let’s say, the Atrix 2 (you get the idea) comes out?

    • Oops, I left out my last point: Additionally, the concept of “docking your smartphone to make it a computer” seems like it will catch like wildfire. So you’ll have two Google OS’ competing in the same market.

      I know I’m probably far behind on all of this, but I just don’t understand how they’re going to differentiate the two.

Comments are closed.